What is a Skincare Specialist?

Skincare specialists cleanse and beautify the face and body to enhance a person’s appearance. They usually work in salons, health and beauty spas, or medical offices. Most work full time. Many work evenings and weekends, especially self-employed workers operating their own salon.

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What does a Skincare Specialist do?

Skincare specialists typically do the following:

  • Evaluate clients’ skin condition and appearance
  • Discuss available treatments and determine which products will improve clients’ skin quality
  • Remove unwanted hair using wax or laser treatment
  • Clean the skin before applying makeup
  • Recommend skincare products, such as cleansers, lotions, or creams
  • Teach and advise clients on how to apply makeup and how to take care of their skin
  • Refer clients to other skincare specialists, such as a dermatologist, for serious skin problems
  • Sterilize equipment and clean work areas.

Skincare specialists give facials, full-body treatments, and head and neck massages to improve the health and appearance of the skin. Some may provide other skincare treatments, such as peels, masks, or scrubs, to remove dead or dry skin. In addition to working with clients, skincare specialists also keep records of skincare regimens that their regular clients use. A growing number of specialists actively sell skincare products, such as cleansers, lotions, and creams. Those who operate their own salons have managerial duties that may include hiring, supervising, and firing workers, as well as keeping business and inventory records, ordering supplies, and arranging for advertising.

What does it take to be a Skincare Specialist?

Skincare specialists usually take an approved cosmetology program. Some high schools offer vocational training. Most people, however, receive their training from a postsecondary vocational school. Newly hired specialists sometimes receive on-the-job training, especially when working with chemicals. Those who are employed in a medical environment may also receive on-the-job training, often working alongside an experienced skincare specialist.

After completing an approved cosmetology program, skincare specialists take a written and practical exam to get a license. Licensing requirements vary by jurisdiction, so those interested should contact the appropriate local agency. Many regions offer continuing education seminars and programs designed to keep skincare specialists current on new techniques and products.

What is the workplace of a Skincare Specialist like?

Skincare specialists usually work in salons, health and beauty spas or, less frequently, in medical offices. The job may involve a great deal of standing. Because skincare specialists must evaluate the skins’ condition, good lighting and clean surroundings are important. Protective clothing and good ventilation also may be necessary because skincare specialists often use chemicals on the face and body.

Skincare specialists typically work full time, with many working nights and weekends. Long hours are common, especially for self-employed workers.

How much does a Skincare Specialist earn?

The median hourly wage of skincare specialists was $13.90 in May 2010. (The median wage is the wage at which half the workers in an occupation earned more than that amount and half earned less.) The lowest 10% of skincare specialists earned less than $8.22, and the top 10% earned more than $24.47.

Learn more about being a Skincare Specialist