$60k $60k
164k 164k
14.0% 14.0%
4.3/5 4.3/5
Bachelors Bachelors

Overview

In the United States, cytotechnology training programs are offered at the baccalaureate and post-baccalaureate (certificate) levels and are located in both university and hospital/laboratory settings. Students may be admitted to a cytotechnology program in their junior or senior year of college or after they have completed their undergraduate studies. Specific course requirements vary somewhat among schools; however, 28 credits of sciences including chemistry and the biological sciences upon completion of a cytotechnology program and three of mathematics, statistics or equivalent are recommended.

Graduates of accredited programs may take the American Society for Clinical Pathology (ASCP) Cytotechnology (CT) certification exam, which is required by many employers. State licensure is also required by several states, but ASCP registration may fulfill licensing requirements in some states (www.ascp.org). An experienced CT with a bachelor's, master's or doctoral degree may obtain additional ASCP certification to become a specialist in cytotechnology, which is generally required for supervisory or academic careers.

How to Become a Cytotechnologist

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  1. Take the Sokanu Career Test

    Would you make a good cytotechnologist? Sokanu's free assessment reveals how compatible you are with a career across 5 dimensions!

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