Overview

Most ironworkers learn their trade through a three-or-four-year apprenticeship. A high school diploma is generally required to begin such an apprenticeship. High school courses in math, shop, blueprint reading, and welding are useful.

Nearly all apprenticeship programs teach both reinforcing and structural ironworking. On the job, apprentices learn to use the tools and equipment of the trade; handle, measure, cut, and lay rebar; and construct metal frameworks.

In technical training, they are taught techniques for reinforcing and installing metals, as well as basic mathematics, blueprint reading and sketching, general construction techniques, safety practices, and first aid. After completing an apprenticeship program, they are considered journey workers who do tasks with less guidance.

What are Ironworkers like?

Realistic

Based on our pool of users, ironworkers tend to be predominately realistic people. Take our career test to see what career interest category best describes you.

Ironworkers by Strongest Interest Archetype

Based on sample of 112 Sokanu users

Are Ironworkers happy?

21%Happy

Ironworkers rank among the least happy careers. Overall they rank in the 21st percentile of careers for satisfaction scores.

Ironworker Career Satisfaction by Dimension

Percentile among all careers

How to Become an Ironworker

  1. Take the Sokanu Career Test

    Would you make a good ironworker? Sokanu's free assessment reveals how compatible you are with a career across 5 dimensions!

    Take the free career test
  2. Jobs in your area
    • Loading jobs...
    View all jobs →

Find your perfect career

Would you make a good ironworker? Sokanu's free assessment reveals how compatible you are with a career across 5 dimensions!

80% Match?
Take the free career test