Career Stats

Salary:
$28,040
Growth:
+12.1%
Rating:
2.9/5
Jobs:
1074K
Education:
H.S. Diploma
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What is a Security Guard?

Also known as: Safety and Security Officer, Security Officer.

A security guard is someone who patrols and inspects property against fire, theft, vandalism, terrorism, and illegal activity. They monitor people and buildings in an effort to prevent crime.

What does a Security Guard do?

Security guards typically do the following:

• Protect and enforce laws on an employer’s property
• Monitor alarms and closed-circuit TV cameras
• Control access for employees, visitors, and outside contractors
• Conduct security checks over a specified area
• Write comprehensive reports outlining what they observed while on patrol
• Interview witnesses for later court testimony
• Detain criminal violators

Guards must remain alert, looking for anything out of the ordinary throughout their shift. In an emergency, guards may call for assistance from police, fire, or ambulance services. Some security guards may be armed.

A security guard’s job responsibilities vary from one employer to another:

  • In retail stores, guards protect people, records, merchandise, money, and equipment. They may work with undercover store detectives to prevent theft by customers or employees, detain shoplifting suspects until the police arrive, or patrol parking lots.

  • In office buildings, banks, hotels, and hospitals, guards maintain order and protect the organization’s customers, staff, and property.

  • In museums or art galleries, guards protect paintings and exhibits by watching people and inspecting packages entering and leaving the building.

  • In factories, government buildings, and military bases, security guards protect information and products and check the credentials of people and vehicles entering and leaving the premises.

  • At universities, in parks, and at sports stadiums, guards do crowd control, supervise parking and seating, and direct traffic.

  • At bars and nightclubs, guards (or bouncers) keep under-age people from entering, collect cover charges at the door, and maintain order among customers.

  • guards who work as transportation security screeners protect people, transportation equipment, and freight at airports, train stations, and other transportation facilities.

What is the workplace of a Security Guard like?

Security guards work in a wide variety of environments, including public buildings, retail stores, and office buildings. Guards who serve as transportation security screeners work in air, sea, and rail terminals and other transportation facilities, and are employed by the federal government. Gaming surveillance officers do most of their work in casino observation rooms, using audio and video equipment.

Most security guards spend considerable time on their feet, either assigned to a specific post or patrolling buildings and grounds. Some may sit for long hours behind a counter or in a guardhouse at the entrance to a gated facility or community. Some security guards provide surveillance around the clock by working shifts of eight hours or longer with rotating schedules.

Guards who work during the day may have a great deal of contact with other employees and the public. Although the work can be routine, it can also be hazardous, particularly when an altercation occurs.

How can I become a Security Guard?

Unarmed guards generally need to have a high school diploma or GED, although some jobs may not have any specific educational requirements. For armed guards, employers usually prefer people who are high school graduates or who have some coursework in criminal justice. Some employers prefer to hire security guards with some higher education, such as a police science or criminal justice degree. Programs and courses that focus specifically on security guards also are available at some postsecondary schools.

Many employers give newly hired guards instruction before they start the job and provide on-the-job training. Training covers numerous topics, such as emergency procedures, detention of suspected criminals, and communication skills.

Drug testing is often required and may be ongoing and random. Many jobs also require a driver's license. An increasing number of states are making ongoing training a legal requirement for keeping a license. Guards who carry weapons must be licensed by the appropriate government authority. Armed guard positions also have more stringent background checks and entry requirements than those of unarmed guards. Rigorous hiring and screening programs, including background, criminal record, and fingerprint checks, are typical for armed guards.

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Further Reading

  • 10 Crucial Duties of a Security Guard or Bodyguard

    Security guards prevent risks and deter crime, watch out for looming danger, and report any crime they may encounter. All the duties performed by a security guard are aimed at this one objective (that is, prevention of crime).

  • Security Guard Job Description

    Security guards are hired by businesses, casinos, hospitals, stores, banks, nuclear power plants and other organizations to help deter illegal activities.

  • Security Guard

    A security guard or security officer is a person who is paid to protect property, assets, or people. They are usually privately and mostly comprised with civilian personnel.

  • Security Officer Vs. Security Guard

    In the world of protective services, there are two types of security professionals: security guard and security officer. The security guard and security officer are both protectors but in a different manner. Each has their own separate job description, duties and training.

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