Overview

The complexity of education and skills development in graphic design grows with each successive level.

A certificate or two-year Associate degree program may be the best place to start for first-time students. These degrees typically offer lower tuition rates and, for some students, are a financially prudent way to gain skills for entry level roles in the graphic design field. Certificate and associate programs focus on building foundational skills and learning key theories in visual communications.

For most design professions, however, a Bachelor’s degree is the minimum educational requirement. In this particular field, the common credential is a Bachelor of Design in Graphic Design or a Bachelor of Fine Arts in Graphic Arts. These four-year programs typically include coursework in studio art, principals of design, computer-aided design, commercial graphics, production, printing techniques, and web design. In addition to developing design-specific aptitudes, design students also often study business basics, contracts, and marketing. This cultivates an understanding of how business leaders think and how to create the kinds of strategies that they can understand and appreciate. As a condition of acceptance, some schools may require applicants to submit sketches and other examples of their artistic ability.

At the Master’s degree level, students focus on studio skills and the development of expert technique; project management; advanced design theory and applications; and potential exploration of a specialty, such as logo design, web and digital design, or multimedia design.

Graphic designers may work directly or indirectly for a client, depending on whether they are employed at a design firm as a member of a collaborative team, or independently as a freelance contractor. In either case, a professional and extensive portfolio is often the deciding factor in getting a job. For this reason, the best education programs provide students with opportunities to build their portfolios via classroom projects, internships, and other experiences.

How long does it take to become a Graphic Designer?

Prospective graphic designers can prepare for their career by earning a two-year Certificate or Associate’s degree or a four-year Bachelor’s. The latter is the more common option. Those wishing to compete for high-level positions in the field may consider an additional two to three years of study to complete a Master’s program.

Steps to becoming a Graphic Designer

The work of a graphic designer is perhaps the pinnacle of combining the technical and the practical with the artistic and the creative. This multifaceted profession calls for both career-long learning and ongoing exploration of the relationship between cohesive design and human experience.

1 High School

While in high school, aspiring graphic designers should take classes in art history, drawing, photography, graphic arts, computer graphics, and website design. They can put their emerging skills to use designing and producing the school newspaper or yearbook.

Some early study of graphic design on the internet is also recommended. Search ‘graphic design course syllabus’ online and review the student learning objectives and textbooks used to meet these objectives. Select, find, and read one or more of these textbooks.

To learn some of the basic computer skills used by graphic designers, consider watching online tutorials on YouTube, Hack Design, Tuts+ Design and Illustration Guides, and other websites.

2 Bachelor’s Degree

There was a time when graphic designers could get hired strictly on the strength of their creative portfolio. Today, however, most employers seek job candidates with a more complete and well-rounded education – the kind only a university degree can provide. A certificate in the field or an Associate’s degree may be sufficient in some cases, but the U.S. Department of Labor reports that designers are much more likely to land a quality position with a Bachelor’s degree. Approximately sixty-two percent of practising graphic designers hold a Bachelor’s from a degree program accredited by the National Association of Schools of Art and Design (www.nasad.arts-accredit.org).

Components of a Bachelor of Design in Graphic Design or a Bachelor of Fine Arts in Graphic Arts typically include the following:

Design fundamentals
 Concepts and applications of design elements and relationships
 Design applications for lines, colors, textures, shapes, values, and white space principles applicable to most graphic design projects

Introduction to typography
 Study of typography – the art and technique of arranging type – as it applies in design and how it affects meaning, brand, or personality
 Baseline skills in type styles and fonts used in text and logos
 Study of how visual details may be perceived by an audience

Color theory
 Immersed study of color, how it impacts cultural or psychological levels, and the effects of color interactions
 Focus on color design in print, web, multimedia, and hand-held devices

Web design
 Graphic design applications in online and multimedia publishing
 Technical environments and elements of navigation, usability, and web best practices
 Top-down understanding of graphic design methods for digital projects
 Focus on technique and theory; not on specific code or interface design software

Production for digital and print and environments
 Focus on delivering production-ready graphics as well as files for print and mobile devices
 Hands-on experience creating design concepts and delivering files using industry-standard project management protocols and design software

Media management in digital design
 Advanced course integrating print and digital techniques for creating and managing visual communications across a range of channels with distinct timelines
 Instruction in coordinating staff and overseeing a series of processes
 Introduction to project management software and design development tools

Graphic designer as entrepreneur
 Study of the history, change, and contemporary impacts on communication tools
 Focus on how to build a successful enterprise
 Real world application of theories and best practices
 Business, marketing, and promotion techniques specifically for design entrepreneurs

Portfolio development
 Compilation of previous design work into an effective portfolio, typically a graduation requirement for seniors
 Design and development of a portfolio of projects that demonstrate growth of skills and creativity
 Instruction in presenting a portfolio and clearly discussing one’s skills and abilities

Not all college programs in graphic design require internships, but those that do offer students an exceptional opportunity to gain practical experience, to form professional relationships in the design community, and to complete work suitable for presentation in their portfolio or design book.

3 A Compelling Portfolio

While a solid resume is an important aspect of any job search, the greatest asset to someone looking for a job in graphic design is an impressive portfolio. The only way for a prospective employer to understand an applicant’s abilities is through a portfolio demonstrating a range of work and growth as a designer.

There was a time when a graphic design portfolio was a simple collection of a designer’s best newspaper and magazine advertisements. Professional portfolios today are much more sophisticated, consisting not only of print ads, but also including online advertisements, website graphics, and even a television commercial reel and animation demo. It is not uncommon for job seekers today to carry fully digital versions of their portfolio on CD or DVD with them to interviews, along with the more traditional paper version. Many designers also maintain their own up-to-date design portfolio website. For those just starting out, presenting a large and varied portfolio is difficult given the limited amount of work they will have completed. These designers should focus on quality instead of quantity, presenting only their best design samples and a portfolio arranged to meet a prospective employer’s specific needs.

Here are some keys to creating a compelling portfolio:

Select your best pieces of work.
Avoid including everything you have ever created. Instead, pick the pieces you are most proud of, pieces that showcase your abilities and confidence.

Include a variety of work samples.
Pick pieces that demonstrate your range of skills, from typography to web design to logo design and more. Include self-initiated work, as well as projects that you have completed for specific clients.

Contextualize your work.
For each piece of work that you include in your portfolio, write one or two paragraphs articulating the client’s objective and how your design met that objective. Explain your inspiration for the design and your creative process. Include accolades received form clients and describe how your design increased sales activity for your client.

4 Employment

Ad agencies, publishing houses, printing companies, service bureaus, newspapers and magazines, TV and movie studios are among the potential employers of graphic designers. Freelancing is also an option.

Generally, graphic designers must work in an entry-level role for one to three years before advancing in the field. Typeface designer, environmental designer, or identity designer are possible intermediate steps leading to the position of chief designer, art director, production director, or graphic design instructor at a post-secondary institution.

5 Specialization (optional)

Specialization is certainly not a requirement in the graphic design field. However, designers who choose to specialize often consider concentrating on one or more of the following:

 Typography
 Desktop Publishing
 Branding and Advertising
 E-mail Blasts and eNewsletters
 Interface or User Experience Design
 Web Design
 Product Packaging
 Book Design
 Logos
 Print or Web Production

Successful graphic designers incorporate fundamental formal knowledge of artistic communications theory with a fluency in using contemporary design tools. These tools are many and varied. Which the graphic designer uses will be dependent on their area of specialization in the field.

For the print designer, key graphic programs include:
 QuarkXPress
 Adobe FrameMaker
 Adobe InDesign
 Adobe PageMaker

The digital designer uses software including:
 Adobe Illustrator
 CorelDraw Graphics Suite
 Adobe Fireworks
 Adobe FreeHand

Digital designers who work in the online environment can benefit by using:
 Adobe Flash Player
 Adobe Dreamweaver
 Macromedia HomeSite

Among the key software tools for motion graphics designers are:
 Autodesk Maya
 CINEMA 4D
 3D Studio Max
 MoGraph
 Adobe After Effects

Of course, generalists may have a foundational skill set in a number of print and digital environments, or they may choose to specialize in just one or two key programs.

6 Stay Current

Graphic design is a constantly changing and developing field. Designers must keep up with the commercial and artistic trends in the industry, or they may find themselves quickly left behind. They must also remain current on new and updated computer graphics and design software programs, which are in a near constant state of evolution. This is particularly true for designers working as freelancers, and for those interested in advancing to higher positions within their companies.

Several professional organizations, such as the ones listed below, offer tools and resources and provide members with educational updates on new technology, software, or methodology. Design industry vendors may also provide certification programs specific to their software and other products.

 AIGA – American Institute of Graphic Arts (www.aiga.org)
 ICOGRADA – The International Council of Graphic Design Associations
(www.ico-d.org)
 Graphic Artists Guild (www.graphicartistsguild.org)
 Society of Illustrators (www.societyillustrators.org)
 Association of Registered Graphic Designers (www.rgd.ca)
International Society of Typographic Designers (www.istd,org.uk)
 SIAD – Society of Illustrators, Artists, and Designers (www.siad.org)
 Society for Experiential Graphic Design (www.segd.org)

7 Master’s Degree (optional)

There are two graduate degrees for students of graphic design: the Masters of Arts (MA) and Masters of Fine Arts (MFA). The MA is a theoretical and academically advanced degree, while the MFA is the pinnacle professional degree for graphic artists and related professionals. Another distinction is that the MA student focuses on a singular academic specialization, sometimes in preparation for teaching; while the MFA student is free to explore a wide range of skill applications and elective fields. Degree requirements include completion of a research or theoretical study for the MA, and a creative dissertation or portfolio for MFA students. B oth degrees take from two to three years to complete, depending on the programs and graphic design schools.

MFA graduates use their portfolios or graduation projects to address real world communication challenges or to demonstrate newly integrated advanced skills. Here are six skill takeaways from an MFA degree program:

Visual Literacy
MFA graduates have built upon a foundational knowledge of design and graphics production. They demonstrate advanced knowledge on topics such as composition, color theory, and typography in order to create a persuasive final product.

Creative Thinking
At the graduate level, students learn to solve creative or business problems holistically. MFA graduates also typically build upon practical experience in the field, demonstrating creative flexibility and proficiency in turning concepts into client deliverables.

Artistic Originality
MFA students learn to develop their own creative expressions. They are aware of the tools at their disposal, but are not bound by a single solution or style. They have the knowledge to originate and develop a signature style and the skills to express their own aesthetics.

Collaboration
An MFA program is not completed in isolation; even online graduate students work in teams. Knowing how to collaborate with design and technology teams and how to work effectively with demanding clients can spell the difference between success and failure. Graduates have the communication and leadership skills that get the most out of a creative team.

Business Acumen
Whether they work independently or with a creative firm, graphic designers are dependent upon skills in sales, marketing, and customer relations. MFA grads have experience in business, entrepreneurship, and marketing. They know how to sell designs to clients, pitch to their creative managers, and how to successfully and effectively navigate professional and business relationships.

Motion Graphics
Graduates demonstrate competence in the theory and application of motion graphics often used in the creation of entertainment, broadcast, web, and emerging media. They also have advanced knowledge of software and industry-standard tools.

Should I become a Graphic Designer?

‘Should I become a graphic designer?’ Perhaps the best way to answer that question is with another question: What makes a great designer?

While there is no singular formula, there are most definitely some qualities which successful graphic designers tend to share. They combine sharp analytical skills with artistic talent to produce convincing illustrations that clearly relate to their clients’ messages. They have the capacity to critique their own work and recognize that they ‘are not quite there yet.’ Although they spend some time developing ideas on paper, they are comfortable utilizing specialized graphic design software. They develop sharp interpersonal skills, as they spend a significant amount of time communicating with clients and coordinating work with members of a design team. In addition, in an industry that typically involves completing multiple projects simultaneously, they are expert time manager. Above all, and not unexpectedly, graphic designers are visual and imaginative thinkers. They know how to best use digital tools to solve business challenges and creatively use the space they have to make the greatest impact.

A few more things to know about working as a graphic designer:

Learning will be a daily thing.
The work of a graphic designer is work that never stops evolving or improving. The evolution and improvement, as in many other fields, come from making mistakes; from getting bad in order to be good. Simply stated, design is a never-ending whirlwind of discovery, invention, and reinvention.

Design will always be in demand.
In the age of automation, when we are constantly being told that our jobs will one day be taken over by robots, you can rest assured that graphic design will always require human thinking and creativity. They are essential cogs in this industry. From simple business cards and printed materials, to packaging, websites, and advertisements, every brand and every business relies on visual communication. And it takes a designer to imagine all of the possibilities.

Design opens up many different career paths.
As a graphic designer, you will be able to add value to any workplace, not just a design studio. If an agency isn’t quite right for you, you might want to venture into editorial design and work for a major publisher. Or join an internal team at one of the world’s biggest sports brands? Your career path is open to many different and exciting routes.

You will almost always work as part of a team.
Graphic designers rarely work alone. They are often part of a creative team collaborating with clients to come up with the best possible solution. Your professional circle will invariably include PR specialists, copywriters, marketers, and advertisers. You will probably consult with senior management and company directors. Your role will rely on establishing and sustaining many business relationships and dealing effectively with different personalities.

Your career path is unpredictable.
Graphic design can take you to places you never thought possible. You could secure a job at a studio in your home city or on the other side of the world. Your work may require that you travel to far flung places. You might go solo and launch your own studio. The possibilities are as numerous as design is creative.

You could see your work in lights.
How would you feel if you spotted your work on a billboard? Or in a magazine? Seeing your creativity up in lights for everyone to see can be overwhelming. Imagine the sense of job satisfaction and the feeling of contributing to something that you know will inspire many people.

The way you see the world will change.
When you walk down the street as a graphic designer, you’ll see things in a completely new light. Your job will become your life – in a fun way – and you’ll find inspiration in everything you see and do, saving ideas for your next project. Design brings a new perspective; it encourages you to get out there and discover new things. Architecture, art galleries, clothing, accessories; everything in your life will be full of creative wonder.

You will never stop being inspired.
Design trends will evolve and change and keep you on your toes from one day to the next. You will never know what’s just around the corner. Design will never bore you. It will always leave you inspired. It will often stir you.

What are Graphic Designers like?

Artistic

Based on our pool of users, graphic designers tend to be predominately artistic people. While this comes as no surprise, given the visual and creative nature of their work, it should be noted that graphic designers must also cultivate refined analytical, communication, computer, and project management skills. Logically, their investigative and enterprising scores are next highest on the interest archetype scale. Part of their art, it seems, is being adaptable and versatile.

Graphic Designers by Strongest Interest Archetype

Based on sample of 6714 Sokanu users

Are Graphic Designers happy?

65%Happy

Graphic designers rank highly among careers. Overall they rank in the 67th percentile of careers for satisfaction scores. Please note that this number is derived from the data we have collected from our Sokanu members only.

The high happiness quotient in the graphic design industry may be rooted in the endless opportunities it presents to its practitioners to imagine, to create, to collaborate, to inspire, and to see their work on public display.

Graphic Designer Career Satisfaction by Dimension

Percentile among all careers

Education History of Graphic Designers

The most common degree held by graphic designers is Graphic Design. 8% of graphic designers had a degree in graphic design before becoming graphic designers. That is over 6 times the average across all careers. Fine Arts graduates are the second most common among graphic designers, representing 4% of graphic designers in the Sokanu user base, which is 1.9 times the average.

Graphic Designer Education History

This table shows which degrees people earn before becoming a Graphic Designer, compared to how often those degrees are obtained by people who earn at least one post secondary degree.

Degree % of graphic designers % of population Multiple
Graphic Design 7.9% 1.3% 5.8×
Fine Arts 3.7% 1.9% 1.9×
Communications 2.5% 3.3% 0.8×
Commercial Art And Graphic Design 1.9% 0.3% 6.6×
Business Management And Administration 1.6% 6.5% 0.2×
English Literature 1.5% 4.9% 0.3×
Advertising 1.5% 0.6% 2.3×
Marketing And Marketing Research 1.2% 2.2% 0.6×
Psychology 1.2% 6.7% 0.2×

Graphic Designer Education Levels

62% of graphic designers have a bachelor's degree. 23% of graphic designers have an associate's degree.

No education 0%
High school diploma 4%
Associate's degree 23%
Bachelor's degree 62%
Master's degree 4%
Doctorate degree 0%

How to Become a Graphic Designer

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Further Reading

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Recommended Books

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